Review: Summer’s Last Will and Testament by Thomas Nashe

  Saturday 30 September saw a unique staging of Thomas Nashe’s only extant whole-authored play, Summer’s Last Will and Testament, in the Great Hall of the Bishop’s Palace in Croydon, where it was first performed in the early autumn of 1592. The performance was a joint venture between the Edward’s Boys company, from the King … Continue reading Review: Summer’s Last Will and Testament by Thomas Nashe

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Review: Emigrants by James Evans

Otto von Bismarck was once asked to identify the pre-eminent fact in modern world history. That America spoke English, he replied. In Emigrants, James Evans attempts to explain how and why that happened. For much of the 17th century, England was something of a failed state. In mid-century it collapsed into a brutal and protracted … Continue reading Review: Emigrants by James Evans

Review: So High A Blood by Morgan Ring

So High A Blood explores in detail the life of Margaret, Countess of Lennox, a Tudor princess without whom, perhaps, there would have been no Stewart succession and no subsequent union between England and Scotland. Born in 1515, Margaret was the daughter of Margaret Tudor, the eldest daughter of Henry VII, by her second husband … Continue reading Review: So High A Blood by Morgan Ring

Review: The Black Prince of Florence by Catherine Fletcher

This review first appeared in the Financial Times on April 29, 2016 Alessandro de’ Medici reigned from 1532 to 1537 as the first duke of one of Italy’s greatest city-states. Yet just as he lived in obscurity until his teens in the late 1520s, he has largely been returned to that obscurity by historians ever … Continue reading Review: The Black Prince of Florence by Catherine Fletcher

Review: Merchant Adventurers by James Evans

This review appears in the current December/January issue of  Management Today. The recent media coverage of the discovery of Sir John Franklin’s flagship, the HMS Erebus, on the sea floor in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, is a reminder of the public’s abiding fascination with the Age of Exploration and of its huge cost, in terms … Continue reading Review: Merchant Adventurers by James Evans

Divided Souls – a review of God’s Traitors: Terror and Faith in Elizabethan England by Jessie Childs

The daily lives of catholics in England under Elizabeth I and James I have long been neglected by historians. True, much as been written about the various attempts against Elizabeth during her reign – most obviously the Babington ‘complotment’ which resulted in the execution of Mary, Queen of Scots – and, of course, the Gunpowder … Continue reading Divided Souls – a review of God’s Traitors: Terror and Faith in Elizabethan England by Jessie Childs

Review: Elizabeth I and her people – National Portrait Gallery exhibition

Those whose interest lies outside the Tudor era could be forgiven for exasperation at the extent to which the long sixteenth century still dominates our nation’s cultural life. But the new exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery – Elizabeth I and Her People, which runs until January 5 2014 – is nevertheless good enough to … Continue reading Review: Elizabeth I and her people – National Portrait Gallery exhibition