File-sharing and the future of publishing

Megan McArdle has recently posted a couple of excellent blog posts (here and here) on The Atlantic on the subject of illegal downloading, and where on the spectrum from file-sharing to file-stealing it really sits. This is, of course, a thorny problem – and one that excites a great deal of passion on either side. … Continue reading File-sharing and the future of publishing

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The trial of Sir Walter Ralegh: a transcript

Sir Walter Ralegh was tried for treason in the great hall of Winchester Castle on Thursday 17 November 1603. As with almost all treason trials of the period, the result was a foregone conclusion: he was found guilty. The jury took less than fifteen minutes to reach its conclusion, surprising even the king's counsel, the … Continue reading The trial of Sir Walter Ralegh: a transcript

The Grotian moment: Hugo Grotius and the invention of international law

A lawyer serving a life sentence escapes from prison hidden in a bookcase: as a plot point it would have the sort of ironic neatness that gives novelists and screenwriters a bad name. In this instance, however, it is true. It happened on 22 March 1621. The prison was the 14th Century castle of Loevestein, … Continue reading The Grotian moment: Hugo Grotius and the invention of international law